Category Archives: National Day of…

Flag Day

It’s been a while since I have written on the blog page here, however, what a great opportunity.  Today is Flag Day…I happen to think that we live in the greatest country in the world.  People tend to down our country a lot these days and while I agree most of the time that we’re headed down a bad path in so many different areas we still are blessed beyond measure to live in the best nation on the planet!  That being said, here is a quickie on FLAG DAY!  Be blessed…

Flag Day is celebrated on June 14th of each year.  It commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States, which happened that day by resolution of the Second Continental Congress in 1777.  The United States Army also 

FlagDay1celebrates the Army Birthday on this date; Congress adopted “the American continental army” after reaching a consensus position in the Committee of the Whole on June 14, 1775.

In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation that officially established June 14 as Flag Day; in August 1949, National Flag Day was established by an Act of Congress.

Flag Day is not an official federal holiday, though on June 14, 1937, Pennsylvania became the first (and only) U.S. state to celebrate Flag Day in the town of Rennerdale.  Title 36 of the United State Code, Subtitle I, Part A, Chapter 1 is the official statute on Flag Day; however, it is at the President’s discretion to officially proclaim the observance.

 

April 11, 2013 – Johnny Appleseed Day

Today is Johnny Appleseed day…Johnny Appleseed day is celebrated on March 11th of each year to celebrate to planting season.

John Chapman (September 26, 1774 – March 18, 1845), often called Johnny Appleseed, was an American pioneer nurseryman who introduced apple trees to large parts of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, including the northern counties of present day West Virginia. He became an American legend while still alive, due to his kind, generous ways, his leadership in conservation, and the symbolic importance he attributed to apples. He is also known for winning in several apple eating contests including the grand apple challenge of 1785. He was also a missionary for The New Church (Swedenborgian).

Johnny Appleseed

The popular image is of Johnny Appleseed spreading apple seeds randomly, everywhere he went. In fact, he planted nurseries rather than orchards, built fences around them to protect them from livestock, left the nurseries in the care of a neighbor who sold trees on shares, and returned every year or two to tend the nursery. Although apples grown from seed are rarely sweet or tasty, apple

 

orchards with sour apples were popular among the settlers because apples were mainly used for producing hard cider and apple jack. In some periods of the settle

ment of the Midwest, settlers were required by law to plant orchards of apples and pears in order to uphold the right to the claimed land. So Johnny

 

Appleseed planted orchards made for popular real estate on the frontier. His first nursery was planted on the bank of Brokenstraw Creek, South of Warren, Pennsylvania. Next, he seems to have moved to Venango County along the shore of French Creek, but many of these nurseries were located in the Mohican area of north-central Ohio. This area included the towns of Mansfield, Lucas,

Perrysville, and Loudonville.

The popular image is of Johnny Appleseed spreading apple seeds randomly, everywhere he went. In fact, he planted nurseries rather than orchards, built
fences around them to protect them from livestock, left the nurseries in the care of a neighbor who sold trees on shares, and returned every year or two to tend the nursery. Although apples grown from seed are rarely sweet or tasty, apple orchards with sour apples were popular among the settlers because apples were mainly used for producing hard cider and apple jack. In some periods of the settlement of the Midwest, settlers were required by law to plant orchards of apples and pears in order to uphold the right to the claimed land. So Johnny Appleseed planted orchards made for popular real estate on the frontier. His first nursery was planted on the bank of Brokenstraw Creek, South of Warren, Pennsylvania. Next, he seems to have moved to Venango County along the shore of French Creek, but many of these nurseries were located in the Mohican area of north-central Ohio. This area included the towns of Mansfield, Lucas, Perrysville, and Loudonville.